Nutrition Courses

Below is a list of Nutrition courses offered at Pacific Rim College.

Foundations of Holistic Nutrition (NU101)

This course introduces students to the exciting world of whole foods nutrition and food as medicine. Students explore the attributes of foods and their properties in order to understand what to favour and to avoid in the presence of various pathological syndromes. Students also learn the role digestion plays in nutrition. Dietary philosophies from major medicinal lineages are discussed, including Traditional Chinese Medicine and Ayurveda. This course begins to build the framework and theory of food as treatment. This course is recommended for students in their first year of studies.

Prerequisites: – –    Semester: Fall, Winter    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Professional Cooking (NU111)

Join Celebrity Chef Dan Hayes and other leading Victoria chefs for a 15-week Professional Cooking class held at The London Chef, Victoria’s premier teaching kitchen. By actively participating, students learn the entire process of food preparation of various cultural-based dishes, primarily using whole foods. The final part of each course includes a long table dining experience where students get to enjoy a multi-course gourmet meal. Dan’s food is heavily influenced by his classic French training and love of Mediterranean cuisine. He is passionate about sustainable seafood, sharp knives, and the joy of cooking. In addition to running his own kitchen, Dan regularly teaches in Vancouver, Toronto and London, and stars in documentary food series Moosemeat & Marmalade – an informative and highly entertaining exploration of culture, worldview and really good food. This course is limited to 18 participants.

Prerequisites: – –    Semester: Fall    Fee: $150    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Science of Nutrition (NU202)

This course offers a deep introduction to the discipline of integrative nutrition in its contemporary Western context. The course investigates foods and nutrients both scientifically and according to ‘traditional’ understandings, while also considering health, ecology, politics and economics. Students will gain practical skills and understanding toward incorporating nutritional recommendations into their clinical practice.

Prerequisites: BMS101/102, BMS113    Semester: Fall, Winter    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Evolution of Cultural Diets (NU203)

There are as many dietary traditions around the world as there are cultures. This course explores some of the most significant, extreme and influential cultural food practices and puts them in perspective for modern therapeutic application. This course examines how traditional and contemporary dietary practices around the world have evolved and been influenced by factors such as geography, environment, social structure, and religion. It also looks at how changing agricultural practices have contributed to changes – both positive and negative – in regional eating habits, and how cultural dietary practices are linked to patterns of health and disease.

Prerequisites: – –    Semester: Fall, Winter    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Food, Ecology and Society (NU204)

This course exposes corruption and politics within the global corporate food industry. Discussion topics include food security, GMO foods, the meat industry, and government regulations to name a few. Students gain a basic understanding of key factors contributing to the dominant global economy of food and are able to explain how our apparent abundance of cheap food is made possible through externalities (pollution, water shortages, etc.) subsidies, and inequalities. This course also looks at various food systems designs and farming models, which attempt to address, amend and build new localized food economies. Students consider how food systems and their involvement as eaters affect their lives, their place and the lives and places of others.

Prerequisites: – –    Semester: Winter    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Materia Medica of Food (NU221)

This course surveys the therapeutic properties of some of the most common and nutrient-rich foods. As with plant materia medicas, much emphasis will be placed on food monographs. 

Prerequisites: NU101    Semester: Fall, Winter    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Supplements (NU302)

This course examines dietary supplements including vitamins, minerals, and herbal therapeutics. Students examine lifestyle habits and physiology that my cause imbalances and deficiencies in micronutrients and learn about potential side effects including supplement-drug-food interactions.

Prerequisites: NU202    Semester: Fall, Winter    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Nutrients and Diet Therapeutics I (NU311)

In Nutrients and Diet Therapeutics courses, students learn to create customized nutritional plans for patients. Students learn how to determine the effectiveness of treatment and the limitations of nutritional therapeutics within these conditions. The courses draw on the knowledge that students have gained from Anatomy and Physiology, Pathophysiology and their clinical experience. This course establishes foundational principles of food-based therapy and includes the discussion of Digestive, Hepatic and Metabolic therapeutics.

NU311 Nutrients and Diet Therapeutics I must either be taken prior or concurrent to Nutrients and Diet Therapeutics II-VI.

Prerequisites: BMS201/202, NU101, NU202    Semester: Fall, Winter    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Nutrients and Diet Therapeutics II (NU312)

In Nutrients and Diet Therapeutics courses, students learn to create customized nutritional plans for patients. Students learn how to determine the effectiveness of treatment and the limitations of nutritional therapeutics within these conditions. The courses draw on the knowledge that students have gained from Anatomy and Physiology, Pathophysiology and their clinical experience. This course includes the discussion of Respiratory, Dermatological, and Immunological therapeutics.

Prerequisites: NU311 or concurrent enrolment    Semester: Fall, Winter    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Nutrients and Diet Therapeutics III (NU313)

In Nutrients and Diet Therapeutics courses, students learn to create customized nutritional plans for patients. Students learn how to determine the effectiveness of treatment and the limitations of nutritional therapeutics within these conditions. The courses draw on the knowledge that students have gained from Anatomy and Physiology, Pathophysiology and their clinical experience. This course includes the discussion of Gynecology, Obstetrics and Endocrinology.

Prerequisites: NU311 or concurrent enrolment    Semester: Winter, Summer    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Nutrients and Diet Therapeutics IV (NU314)

In Nutrients and Diet Therapeutics courses, students learn to create customized nutritional plans for patients. Students learn how to determine the effectiveness of treatment and the limitations of nutritional therapeutics within these conditions. The courses draw on the knowledge that students have gained from Anatomy and Physiology, Pathophysiology and their clinical experience. This course includes the discussion of Psychiatric, Neurological and Musculoskeletal therapeutics.

Prerequisites: NU311 or concurrent enrolment    Semester: Fall, Summer    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Nutrients and Diet Therapeutics V (NU315)

In Nutrients and Diet Therapeutics courses, students learn to create customized nutritional plans for patients. Students learn how to determine the effectiveness of treatment and the limitations of nutritional therapeutics within these conditions. The courses draw on the knowledge that students have gained from Anatomy and Physiology, Pathophysiology and their clinical experience. This course includes the discussion of Men’s Health, Renal System and Cardiovascular System.

Prerequisites: NU311 or concurrent enrolment    Semester: Winter    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Nutrients and Diet Therapeutics VI (NU316)

In Nutrients and Diet Therapeutics courses, students learn to create customized nutritional plans for patients. Students learn how to determine the effectiveness of treatment and the limitations of nutritional therapeutics within these conditions. The courses draw on the knowledge that students have gained from Anatomy and Physiology, Pathophysiology and their clinical experience. This course includes the discussion of Pediatrics, Geriatrics, Oncology and Palliative Care.

Prerequisites: NU311 or concurrent enrolment    Semester: Summer    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Toxicity of Foods (NU322)

This course explores key toxic effects of food production on the ecosystem and human health. Students learn about dominant foods in our global society and their effects on the ecosystem and human health, why and how new food systems and dietary changes can counteract toxic effects of food, and how one might influence behaviour changes towards a more holistic diet for personal, family and community benefit.

Prerequisites: NU202    Semester: Winter    Credits: 3    Hours: 45