Oriental Medicine Courses

Below is a list of Oriental Medicine courses offered at Pacific Rim College.

TCM Foundations (OM101/102)

Students are introduced to the basic philosophies and principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Topics covered include the history of acupuncture; theories of Yin and Yang and the Five Elements; organ-based theories; an exploration of the system of channels, collaterals and acupuncture points; vital substances such as qi, blood, body fluids and essence; constitutional characteristics that affect health and well being; an introduction to disease including etiological factors and pathogenesis; preventative concepts including lifestyle, exercise and diet; and diagnostic and therapeutic concepts inherent to Chinese Medicine. This course is recommended for students in their first two semesters of studies.

Prerequisites: – –    Semester: Fall, Winter    Credits: 6    Hours: 90

Chinese Medicine for Natural Health Practitioners (OM103/104)

This course is designed for students not enrolled in a diploma program within the School of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine. Natural health students are introduced to the basic philosophies and principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Topics covered include the history of acupuncture; theories of Yin and Yang and the Five Elements; organ-based theories; an exploration of the system of channels and collaterals; vital substances such as qi, blood, body fluids and essence; constitutional characteristics that affect health and well being; preventative concepts including lifestyle, exercise and diet; and diagnostic and therapeutic concepts inherent to Chinese Medicine. This course is recommended for students during their first three semesters of studies.

Prerequisites: – –    Semester: Fall, Winter    Credits: 6    Hours: 90

Introduction to Tai Qi Chuan (OM111)

This course introduces students to the fundamental theories and practices of Tai Qi Chuan. Tai Qi Chuan is the Chinese system of healing that uses specific movements and exercises that are intended to harmonize and improve both body and spirit. This course contains both theoretical and practical components.

Prerequisites: – –    Semester: Fall, Summer    Credits: 1.5    Hours: 22.5

Introduction to Qi Gong (OM112)

This course introduces students to the fundamental theories and practices of Qi Gong. Qi Gong is the practice of controlling the flow and distribution of “life energy” in order to improve the health and harmony of the mind and body. This course contains both theoretical and practical components.

Prerequisites: – –    Semester: Winter, Summer    Credits: 1.5    Hours: 22.5

Tui Na (OM113)

Tui Na is a form of Chinese therapeutic massage that can be used alone or in conjunction with acupuncture and herbal medicine. Through both theoretical and practical components, students learn the basic principles and common therapeutic techniques of Tui Na, how to treat various common syndromes, and gain an understanding of how to apply those in a therapeutic setting. Some students find that the knowledge gained in BMS103 Surface Anatomy is helpful for this course.

Prerequisites: – –    Semester: Fall, Summer    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Medical Mandarin (OM121)

This course introduces students to the basics of Mandarin Chinese, including the Romanised alphabet known as Pin Yin. Pronunciation of this tonal language is emphasized as well as word recognition. Mostly terms relevant to the study of Traditional Chinese Medicine, including foundational terms, acupuncture point names and herbs names, are covered.

Prerequisites: – –    Semester: Fall    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

TCM Diagnosis (OM201/202)

Traditional Chinese Medicine diagnosis involves the use of various palpatory, visual, olfactory, and inquiry techniques to determine the state of health and wellness of an individual. This course provides students with a thorough understanding of TCM diagnostic principles, which are applicable to acupuncture, herbology and other disciplines of Traditional Chinese Medicine. As mainstays in TCM diagnosis, tongue and pulse diagnosis are thoroughly explored, and all facets of diagnosis are covered both theoretically and practically. This course then continues with differentiation of syndromes based on the Eight Principles, Zang Fu differentiation, pathogenic factors, Six Channels, Four Levels and San Jiao.

Prerequisites: OM101/102    Semester: Winter, Summer    Credits: 6    Hours: 90

TCM Food Therapy (OM203)

Food Therapy is a branch of Chinese Medicine that uses food as preventative and curative therapy. This course examines traditional Chinese foods and diets, principles and philosophies TCM-based food therapy, and emphasizes the energetic effect of various foods, teas and spices after consumption.

Prerequisites: OM103/104    Semester: Fall    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Intermediate Qi Gong (OM212)

As an extension to OM112 Introduction to Qi Gong, this course builds on previous knowledge and experience by integrating both table and floor work into an intermediate level course. Floor work allows students to experience a restorative practice. They work with different partners to experience Qi Gong from both patient and practitioner perspectives. Table work gives the patient’s body (muscles) an opportunity to settle into the structure (skeleton) causing the release of muscle tension and the relaxation of the nervous system. Through this process students gain a deeper understanding of the relationship between the muscles, joints, bones, ligaments, and tendons. Table work establishes a greater understanding of how the joints work using the full range of motion with passive movement. Students learn how the joints organize themselves and interact with each other. Table work helps the patient’s body to modify old and harmful patterns. The focus of the class is on building a greater awareness of holistic movements bringing the body’s energies into harmony.

Prerequisites: OM112    Semester: Various    Credits: 1.5    Hours: 22.5

Five Elements (OM231)

In Chinese tradition, Five Elements is a system by which interactions within living beings and between living being and nature can be explored and explained based on general traits associated with the elements known as Wood, Fire, Earth Metal and Water. Students learn the history of the Five Element perspective, the fundamental characteristics of each element and the application of this branch of study to Chinese Medicine. The psychological and behavioural implications of the Five Elements are explored in depth, as well as the associated therapeutic applications including diagnosis, acupuncture point selection and herbology. Treatment protocols including Aggressive Energy, Possession, and Husband-Wife Imbalance are also discussed, as is the integration of 5 Element and TCM Diagnosis.

Prerequisites: OM101/102    Semester: Winter, Summer    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Comprehensive Review (OM301)

Through the investigation and review of past coursework, practical techniques, and case studies, student utilize their prior knowledge in a challenging and theoretical manner. In order to prepare students for various licensing exams, and for providing their patients with optimal care, this course helps students organize straight forward and challenging concepts and cases efficiently and thoroughly for both theoretical and practical application.

Prerequisites: ACU211/212    Semester: Winter, Summer    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Case Studies (OM302)

Students utilize their prior knowledge and in a challenging and theoretical manner in the investigation and assessment of both theoretical and actual clinical cases. Assessments of both straightforward and challenging cases prepare students for providing patients with the optimal treatment plan. Since this course requires a strong base in TCM knowledge, it is an excellent review course in general, but is essentially a course to advance a student’s knowledge and ability to work with complex diagnoses in order to be fully prepared for the post-graduate clinical setting.

Prerequisites: ACU211/212    Semester: Winter, Summer    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Shi Liao: TCM Diet Therapy (OM401)

Shi Liao is a branch of Chinese Medicine that uses food as preventative and curative therapy. This course examines traditional Chinese foods and diets, Shi Liao principles and philosophies and emphasizes the energetic effect of various foods, teas and spices after consumption.

Prerequisites: OM101/102 or OM103/104    Semester: Fall    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

TCM Classics I: Huang Di Nei Jing (OM402)

This course examines one of the most monumental texts in the history of Chinese Medicine, the Huang Di Nei Jing, and investigates its impact on both historical and modern day practices.

Prerequisites: ACU211/212    Semester: Winter    Credits: 1.5    Hours: 22.5

TCM Classics II (OM501)

This course examines a major school of Chinese Medicine known as the Wen Bing Xue and surveys two major texts in Chinese Medicine: the Jin Gui Yao Lue and the Shang Han Lun. Students learn the differentiation of pathogenic cold and warm diseases and the vast pharmacopoeia of herbal formulas that apply.

Prerequisites: CBOT411    Semester: Fall    Credits: 6    Hours: 90

TCM Classics III (OM502)

This course surveys major texts in Chinese Medicine: Nan Jing, Yi Jing, and Shen Nong Ben Cao Jing. Student also explore the similarities and differences of the major TCM classical texts and schools of thought.

Prerequisites: CBOT411, OM501 or concurrent enrolment    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Advanced TCM Internal Medicine (OM511)

This course is a continuation of both CBOT411 and ACU211/2, covering a wider expanse of internal pathologies including less commonly seen disorders and difficult to treat conditions.

Prerequisites: CBOT411    Semester: Winter    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

TCM Psychology (OM512)

Psychology in Traditional Chinese Medicine is viewed from a holistic perspective in which mental, emotional and physical health are interrelated. This course is a detailed exploration of the psyche in Chinese Medicine and investigates the diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric disorders using philosophies and modalities of acupuncture and Oriental Medicine.

Prerequisites: CBOT401/402    Semester: Fall    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

TCM Gerontology and Pediatrics (OM513)

This course examines the effects of aging on health and wellness. Emphasis is placed on age-related illnesses and diseases, psychological factors, dietary concerns and special treatment techniques for assisting elderly patients. This course also examines advanced conditions in TCM Pediatrics.

Prerequisites: ACU211/212, ACU324, CBOT401/402    Semester: Fall    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Advanced TCM Differentiation and Therapeutics (OM521)

Students blend their prior knowledge with advanced information pertaining to modern TCM practice and apply it in a challenging and theoretical manner. Working individually and as teams, students organize straightforward and challenging concepts and cases efficiently and thoroughly for both theoretical and practical application and create effective treatment plans.

Prerequisites: ACU211/212, CBOT401/402, CBOT411    Semester: Fall    Credits: 3    Hours: 45