Western Herbal Sciences Courses

Below is a list of Western Herbal Sciences courses offered at Pacific Rim College.

Introduction to Herbal Medicine (WHS101)

This course explores the early origins of herbal medicine focusing on pre-1900 history with a look forward to the future of herbal medicine in the 21st century. Students learn about herbal traditions of the world that have shaped the world of modern herbal medicine including European Herbal Medicine, Indian Herbal Medicine (Ayurveda), Chinese Herbal Medicine (TCM), African Herbal Medicine, Australian Herbal Medicine (Aboriginal), North American Herbal Medicine and finally South American Herbal Medicine. This course is recommended for students in their first three semester of studies.

Prerequisites: – –    Semester: Fall, Winter, Summer    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Materia Medica I (WHS102)

Students build relationships with the plant medicines that they will be using to create medicines for their patients. During the classes, students use organoleptic skills to experience the herbs that they are studying, including tasting, smelling and observing. Each herb is tried in various forms including teas and tinctures. Monographs of the herbs are provided and there is discussion and debate amongst students about each herb.

This course examines in depth the following herbs: Angelica sinensis, Allium sativum, Althaea officinalis, Angelica archangelica, Arctostaphylos uva-ursi, Avena sativa, Barosma betulina, Calendula officinalis, Capsicum frutescens, Cimicifuga (Actaea)racemosa, Commiphora mol mol, Crataegus spp., Curcuma longa, Echinacea spp., Filipendula ulmaria, Fucus vesiculosus, Harpagophytum procumbens, Hydrastis canadensis, Inula helenium, Mahonia aquifolium, Matricaria recutita, Panax ginseng, Passiflora incarnata, Piper methysticum, Salix alba, Scutellaria lateriflora, Silybum marianum, Smilax spp., Taraxacum officinalis, Vaccinium myrtillus, Valeriana officinalis and Vitex agnus-castus. Other herbs are introduced, time permitting. Students must complete Materia Medica I prior to taking any other Materia Medica courses. This course is recommended for students during their first two semesters of studies.

Prerequisites: – –    Semester: Fall, Winter, Summer    Fee: $15    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Materia Medica II (WHS103)

Students build relationships with the plant medicines that they will be using to create medicines for their patients. During the classes, students use organoleptic skills to experience the herbs that they are studying, including tasting, smelling and observing. Each herb is tried in various forms including teas and tinctures. Monographs of the herbs are provided and there is discussion and debate amongst students about each herb.

This course examines in depth the following herbs: Achillea millefolium, Alchemilla vulgaris, Asparagus racemosa, Baptisia tinctorii, Ceanothus americanus, Centaurium erythrae, Eschscholtzia californica, Euphrasia officinalis, Dioscorea villosa, Equisetum arvense, Galium aperine, Gentiana lutea, Geum urbana, , Glechoma hederacea, Hypericum perforatum, Hyssopus officinalis, Ligusticum porteri, Melissa officinalis, Montia perfoliata, Nepeta cataria, Pimpinella anisum, Plantago spp, Rhamnus purshiana, Rosmarinus officinalis, Salvia officinalis, Sambucus nigra, Solidago virgaurea, Stellaria media, Thymus vulgaris, Tilia europea, Urtica dioica, Usnea wirthii, Verbascum thapsus, Zanthoxylum americanum and Zea mays. Other herbs are introduced, time permitting.

Prerequisites: WHS102    Semester: Winter    Fee: $15    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Flower Essences (WHS104)

A flower essences is the unique vibration of the plant from which the essence is derived.  It is a subtle energy that interfaces with the energy anatomy of humans and has the potential to create healing. This course explores the history of flower essences in the west; other unique vibrations from nature like the sea essences; how to select essences for yourselves and others using kinesiology, repertorizing, dowsing, the 5 elements of TCM and the chakras of Ayurvedic medicine; how to make an essence; using essences with animals; and listening to your inner physician to guide you as a healer.

This course involves field trips outside of the College that the student will be responsible for attending.

Prerequisites: – –    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Practical Herbal Pharmacy (WHS111)

This practical course provides students with an education in the preparation of various herbal products that are required to be effective in the dispensary. The products that are made include Infusions, Tinctures, Syrups, Capsules, Flower Essences, Infused Oils, Herbal Baths, Liniments, Poultices, Fomentations, Salves, Balms and Creams. Each class focuses on one particular product and instructions is given about the use and effectiveness of each preparation. Students take home the products that they make in this class to use and experience themselves. Students are required to complete a practical presentation in class on a product of the student’s choice. This is an ideal class for anyone interested in making their own herbal remedies!

Prerequisites: – –    Semester: Fall, Winter, Summer    Fee: $50    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Backyard Gardening (WHS121)

In the age of financial uncertainty, gardening skills are a sought after commodity. This comprehensive and practical 30-hour introduction to backyard gardening in the Pacific Northwest will provide beginners with the requisite skills, knowledge, and support to begin their own organic growing projects at home. At the end of the program participants understand plant growth requirements and how to provide them for a variety of annual and perennial plants, including food and medicinal crops; the role of a living soil system in growing healthy plants and know how to feed the soil using organic methods; basic gardening methods, including seeding, planting, watering, mulching, cold protection, pruning and container gardening; the role of beneficial species in suppressing pests and disease and know how to manage common insect, weed and disease problems organically; and how to extend and share the harvest.

Prerequisites: – –    Semester: Fall, Winter    Credits: 2    Hours: 30

Ways of Knowing Herbalism (WHS133)

How do we gain new knowledge about the medicine of plants? This course explores how intuition, organoleptic experience, historical and cultural research, scientific research, clinical experience, and the personal connections we make with plants shape practitioners’ understandings of their personal materia medicas. Each student chooses one plant to focus on over the course of the semester, investigating the nature of its medicine through different lenses. Throughout the semester, students share their insights and experiences with each other through seminar-style discussions and longer presentations.

Prerequisites: – –    Semester: Various    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Energetics of Herbal Medicine (WHS151)

Systems of energetics are ways of describing and classifying patterns of disease and properties of plants that provide a basis for herbal therapeutics. In this course, we examine the energetic systems that inform traditional western herbalism. These include the intuitive approach to plant medicine that underlies all energetic systems, the four elements of Greek and Egyptian medicine, the four humours of European medicine and the insights of the Physiomedicalist and Eclectic physicians of the nineteenth century. Students learn to translate the principles of these systems to a contemporary context and apply them in their practice. Some students find it useful to complete WHS101 Intro to Herbal Medicine prior to enrolling in this course.

Prerequisites: – –    Semester: Fall, Winter    Fee: $15    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Materia Medica III (WHS201)

Students build relationships with the plant medicines that they will be using to create medicines for their patients. During the classes, students use organoleptic skills to experience the herbs that they are studying, including tasting, smelling and observing. Each herb is tried in various forms including teas and tinctures. Monographs of the herbs are provided and there is discussion and debate amongst students about each herb.

This course examines in depth the following herbs: Aconitum napellus, Aesculus hippocastanum, Andrographis panniculata, Apium graveolens, Arnicam montana, Atropa belladonna, Bryonia dioica, Caulophyllum thalictroides, Chelidonium majus, Chionanthus virginicus, Convallaria majalis, Cytisus scoparius, Datura stramonium, Ephedra sinica, Galega officinalis, Gelsemium sempervirens, Hamamelis virginiana, Hyoscyamus nigra, Lobelia inflata, Mentha piperita, Ocimum sanctum, Oenothera biennis, Phytolacca decandra, Piscidia erythrina, Prunella vulgaris, Rehmannia glutinosa , Rhodiola rosea, Rumex crispus, Scutellaria baicalensis, Serenoa repens, Solanum dulcamara, Stachys officinalis, Symplocarpus foetidus, Symphytum officinalis, Tabebuia impetiginosa, Tribulus terrestris and Viola odorata. Other herbs are introduced, time permitting.

Prerequisites: WHS102    Semester: Fall    Fee: $15    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Herbal Therapeutics I (WHS202)

In Herbal Therapeutics courses, students learn to create customized treatment plans for patients. This  includes the use of herbal preparations and diet and lifestyle counselling. Students also learn how to determine the effectiveness of treatment and the limitations of herbal medicine therapeutics within these conditions. The courses draw on the knowledge that students have gained from Anatomy & Physiology, Pathophysiology and their clinical experience. This course must be completed prior to a student enrolling in Herbal Therapeutics II-IV. Herbal Therapeutics I includes the discussion of Digestive, Circulatory, Endocrine and Respiratory therapeutics. This course is most appropriate for students who have completed some clinical training and during their third or fourth semester.

 

Prerequisites: 6 credits of Materia Medica, BMS201/202    Semester: Fall    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Materia Medica IV (WHS203)

Students build relationships with the plant medicines that they will be using to create medicines for their patients. During the classes, students use organoleptic skills to experience the herbs that they are studying, including tasting, smelling and observing. Each herb is tried in various forms including teas and tinctures. Monographs of the herbs are provided and there is discussion and debate amongst students about each herb.

This course examines in depth the following herbs: Albizzia lebbeck, Agrimonia eupatoria, Anemone pulsatilla, Arctium lappa, Artemisia absinthum, Bacopa monnieri, Berberis vulgaris, Capsella bursa-pastoris, Chamaelirium luteum, Cinnamomum spp., Corydalis yanhusuo, , Eleutherococcus senticosus, Eupatorium purpurea, Gymnema sylvestre, Humulus lupulus, Juniperus communis, Levisticum officinale, Marrubium vulgare, Melaleuca alternifolia, Menyanthes trifoliata, Mucuna pruriens,, Olea europea, Primula veris, Prunella serotina, Rubus idaeus, Schisandra chinensis, Senna alexandrina, Thuja occidentalis, Turnera diffusa, Tussilago farfara, Uncaria tomentosa, Verbena officinalis, Viburnum opulus, Viburnum prunifolium and Withania somnifera. Other herbs are introduced, time permitting.

Prerequisites: WHS102    Semester: Winter    Fee: $15    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Herbal Therapeutics II (WHS204)

In Herbal Therapeutics courses, students learn to create customized treatment plans for patients. This  includes the use of herbal preparations and diet and lifestyle counselling. Students also learn how to determine the effectiveness of treatment and the limitations of herbal medicine therapeutics within these conditions. The courses draw on the knowledge that students have gained from Anatomy & Physiology, Pathophysiology and their clinical experience. Herbal Therapeutics II-IV can be taken in any order, provided that WHS202 Herbal Therapeutics I is completed first. Herbal Therapeutics II includes the discussion of Palliative, Psychiatric, Geriatrics and Dermatological therapeutics.

Prerequisites: BMS201/202, WHS202    Semester: Winter    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Advanced Herbal Pharmacy (WHS205)

This advanced practical herbal pharmacy course examines manufacturing of both internal and external herbal preparations, focusing on herbal constituent extraction, preservation of herbal products, along with information regarding herbal regulations for products to be sold in Canada. The course entails a variety of tincture making preparations such as macerations (fresh and dried), percolations, decocted tinctures, and discussion regarding fluid extracts and spagyrics. Additionally, advanced herbal preparations such as herbal meads, shampoos/conditioners, toothpaste, deodorants, medicinal soap and sunscreens are made. Included is an advanced dermatology class focusing on facial creams and cleansers for a variety of skin types. Each class is focused on one particular product, outlining ingredients used in traditional products versus more natural products, while the remainder of class is the hands on component of making the product. This class is focused on utilizing raw material ingredients and ‘from scratch’ recipes. Students are required to complete a project comparing constituent extraction with different tincture preparations and a practical presentation in class on a product of the student’s choice. This is an ideal class for anyone interested in creating their own dispensary and/or herbal products for the public.

Prerequisites: WHS111    Semester: Various    Fee: $50    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Wildharvesting Practices for Medicinal Plants (WHS212)

In this semester-long course students learn about the many issues surrounding the sustainable harvest of wild medicinal plants both locally and internationally. Ethical and traditional harvesting practices associated with specific medicines are investigated in depth, with special consideration given to at-risk plants of North America and the Pacific Northwest bioregion. An emphasis is placed on field studies and the development of observational/technical skills in the first two months of class. Students must be prepared to attend all field trips to local sites in various weather conditions. The course is graded on a combination of participation, independent and group projects, and a final research paper.

Prerequisites: BMS211 or permission from Program Dean    Semester: Various    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Wildharvesting Medicinal Plants (WHS225)

This course examines harvesting practices for wild plants. Topics include guidelines for ethical and sustainable harvesting, practical methods for harvesting various species, and consideration for at-risk species. The course includes in-class theoretical lectures and discussions, field work for practical methodology, and take-home readings. Students must be prepared to attend field trips in all weather conditions.

Prerequisites: BMS111 and BMS112 are recommended but not required    Semester: Various    Credits: 2    Hours: 30

Materia Medica of Mushrooms (WHS231)

This course covers medicinal, entheogenic, and culinary mushrooms (which can be classified as medicinal). Each class covers two to three mushroom monographs plus organoleptic sessions whenever supplies permit. This course is aimed at increasing the knowledge and understanding of fungi for both the herbalist and nutritionist.

Prerequisites: – –    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Materia Medica V (WHS301)

Students build relationships with the plant medicines that they will be using to create medicines for their patients. During the classes, students use organoleptic skills to experience the herbs that they are studying, including tasting, smelling and observing. Each herb is tried in various forms including teas and tinctures. Monographs of the herbs are provided and there is discussion and debate amongst students about each herb.

This course examines in depth the following herbs: Aloe vera, Artemisia vulgaris, Astragalus membranaceous, Betula alba, Borago officinalis, Carum carvi, Centella asiatica, Citrus limon, Cola nitida, Eupatorium perfoliatum, Foeniculum vulgare, Ganoderma lucidum, Ginkgo biloba, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Iris versicolor, Juglans nigra, Lactuca villosa, Lavandula officinalis, Linum usitassimum, Lycopus virginicus, Medicago sativa , Mitchella repens, Panax quinquefolium, Parietaria diffusa, Petroselinum crispum, Rheum palmatum, Saponaria officinalis, Scrophularia nodosa, Tanacetum parthenium, Trifolium pratense, Ulmus fulva, Viola tricolor and Zingiber officinalis. Other herbs are introduced, time permitting.

Prerequisites: WHS102    Semester: Fall    Fee: $15    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Materia Medica VI (WHS302)

Students build relationships with the plant medicines that they will be using to create medicines for their patients. During the classes, students use organoleptic skills to experience the herbs that they are studying, including tasting, smelling and observing. Each herb is tried in various forms including teas and tinctures. Monographs of the herbs are provided and there is discussion and debate amongst students about each herb.

This course examines in depth the following herbs: Acorus calamus, Azadirachta indica, Brassica nigra, Camelia sinensis, Chondrus crispus, Elymus repens, Fumaria officinalis, Guaiacum officinale, Hemidesmus indicus, Lamium alba, Leonurus cardiaca, Melilotus officinalis , Oplopanax horridus, Paeonia lactiflora, Picrasma excelsia, Picrorrhiza kurroa, Piper longum, Pulmonaria officinalis, Ruta graveolens, Terminalia arjuna, Trigonella foenum-graecum and Trillium erectum. Other herbs are introduced, time permitting. Students are also expected to prepare a presentation on a herb of their choice from the past 3 years of herbal studies. All other 5 Materia Medica courses must be completed before students can enrol in WHS302.

Prerequisites: WHS102, WHS103, WHS201, WHS203, WHS301, 1.5 credits PCP200    Semester: Winter    Fee: $15    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Herbal Therapeutics III (WHS303)

In Herbal Therapeutics courses, students learn to create customized treatment plans for patients. This  includes the use of herbal preparations and diet and lifestyle counselling. Students also learn how to determine the effectiveness of treatment and the limitations of herbal medicine therapeutics within these conditions. The courses draw on the knowledge that students have gained from Anatomy & Physiology, Pathophysiology and their clinical experience. Herbal Therapeutics II-IV can be taken in any order, provided that WHS202 Herbal Therapeutics I is completed first. Herbal Therapeutics III includes the discussion of  Urology (Male Sexual health), Gynecology, Obstetrics and Pediatrics.

Prerequisites: BMS201/202, WHS202    Semester: Fall    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Herbal Therapeutics IV (WHS305)

In Herbal Therapeutics courses, students learn to create customized treatment plans for patients. This includes the use of herbal preparations and diet and lifestyle counselling. Students also learn how to determine the effectiveness of treatment and the limitations of herbal medicine therapeutics within these conditions. The courses draw on the knowledge that students have gained from Anatomy & Physiology, Pathophysiology and their clinical experience. Herbal Therapeutics II-IV can be taken in any order, provided that WHS202 Herbal Therapeutics I is completed first. Herbal Therapeutics IV includes the discussion of Nervous, Urinary, Autoimmune and Musculoskeletal therapeutics.

Prerequisites: BMS201/202, WHS202    Semester: Winter    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Herbal Case Studies (WHS306)

In this course students discuss various clinical cases of Herbal Medicine including theoretical cases, those published by practitioners and cases seen in the school clinic. The goal is to increase the knowledge base and awareness of each student. Group discussions and debate are used to help achieve these goals. Students are responsible for creating full treatment plans for each case that is discussed and being able to justify their decisions for treatment, which may include referring to other complementary health practitioners.

Prerequisites: BMS201/202, any 2 Herbal Therapeutics courses    Semester: Fall    Credits: 3    Hours: 45

Advanced Therapeutics: Complex Conditions (WHS309)

Although complex disorders are by nature very challenging, helping clients deal with them can be one of the most rewarding areas of practice. Students gain an understanding of how to navigate complex conditions and explore specific herbs and strategies for treatment. Integrating a wide range of relevant study areas (such as that of Complexity Theory itself) and illustrated with reference to case studies, this course intends to equip students not only to be capable of assisting people experiencing complex conditions, but also to enjoy doing so.

Prerequisites: BMS201/202    Semester: various    Credits: 3    Hours: 45