Growing Food and Medicine Systems: Part Two

FMS201

Building on the knowledge covered in Growing Food and Medicine Systems: Part One, this portion of the course focuses on perennial and annual plants that can be used in a permaculture garden setting, incorporating local wild food and medicine plants found in the Pacific Northwest. There is specific focus on ethnobotanical information and ethical harvesting considerations and practices. Specific harvesting practices and regulations for BC are also covered.

This course also covers the production and processing of herbal plants – both wild-harvested and cultivated – for market. Best practices for using wild-harvested and cultivated food and medicine in a commercial setting are explored. Students have the opportunity to participate in hands-on processing of herbal products and edible products. This course also covers the requirements for producing herbal and edible products for sale, and their regulation in the Canadian context.

FMS201a Wild Harvesting

This course focuses on identifying local wild food and medicine plants found in the Pacific Northwest. We spend time in various landscapes (farm, forest and shoreline) and explore plants of interest and aspects of their habitat, health, usage, and role. Students participate in plant walks, process plant materials, and assist in an ecological restoration project. While the goal is for students to learn how to work with native plant species, there will be a concentrated focus on ethical harvesting considerations and practices. Specific harvesting practices and regulations for BC will also be covered. This course is taught in collaboration with the team from PEPÁḴEṈ HÁUTW̱ Native Plants and Education Program.

FMS201b Herbal Production and Processing

This course focuses on practical and philosophical knowledge of plant-based medicines. We discuss the role of herbs in natural and cultivated ecological systems, and explore how medicines originating from an ecological approach improve human health. Students will come to form a deeper relationship with plants as allies, and gain a thorough understanding of how humans and plants relate in the healing process. The course begins with basic herbal concepts – how medicinal plants work – and moves on to hands-on medicinal plant cultivation, harvesting, and medicine-making. Topics include the ecological role of medicinal plants, cultivation and harvesting considerations, preparing plant materials for processing, appropriate and effective medicinal preparations, and applications of each medicine to human health conditions. Other topics covered include considerations for at-risk species, regulatory issues for the Canadian marketplace, herbal first aid, and safety considerations when using herbal medicines.

Prerequisites: FMS101    Credits: 8.5    Hours: 126